New Orleans: Vessel

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One week ago, I submitted my application to some amazing pediatric residency programs. This application process is in some ways easier compared to that of medical school – there are no secondary applications / additional costs, it’s extremely simple to have standardized test scores sent to each school, and the process is just in general streamlined. Nonetheless, this application process is unnerving. It is absolutely wild that…in March I will find out if I have to move for the next three years of my life. To be able to choose where you go to medical school is such a luxury (which, of course, I didn’t appreciate at the time). I’m excited and nervous about what comes next.

Interviews invites have been rolling in and I’m excited about the months of travel to come. I mentioned this on Instagram that as much as I am flattered that you guys are excited to see how this process goes for me, I won’t share specifics about interview invites until after interview season.

So what is going to happen to this space? I’m status post examinations (thank goodness) and beyond graded clerkships. I’ve shared my advice for MS1 – MS3 year coursework. I’ve shared some tips about USMLE 1. I have a few blog posts coming up about USMLE 2 CK and CS in addition to posts about VSAS and ERAS eventually. So back to the original question – what will happen to this space?

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#tagged: Introduction

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Hello guys! I’m sure you’re surprised to see another post this week. Although I’m gearing up for the big day (ERAS submission aka residency application day – September 15th), I have a little bit more time on my hands. I’m back in my public health classes and I’m balancing that with some of the less time-intensive clinical rotations!

As many of you already know, I tend to share a bit of my life as a medical student on Instagram. One of my favorite fellow medical student bloggers / Instagrammers, Melina Rae, tagged me to introduce myself. Given the recent influx of followers on Instagram and readers on the blog, I can’t think of any better timing to reintroduce myself.

Here we go!

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How to Survive Medical School: Obstetrics and Gynecology

I concluded my clerkship year in April. How crazy is that? Since that time —

  1. I took Step 2 Clinical Skills at the end of May — I passed guys!
  2. I took Step 2 Clinical Knowledge at the beginning of July (score is still pending)
  3. I completed a 2 week elective in radiology
  4. I completed a 2 week elective in allergy/immunology
  5. I spent a month in the northeast for an away rotation

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This post, admittedly long overdue, has been drafted for months. One of my friends (hi Ronke!) told me that I have to publish this post before she started her OBGYN rotation (aka on Monday) so I clearly didn’t take her too seriously.

As always, please take my advice with a grain of salt. If you’re looking for more advice, these are some pretty great places to check out as well.

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“For happiness one needs security, but joy can spring like a flower even from the cliffs of despair” – Anne Morrow Lindbergh

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Too often, we find ourselves trapped in the mindset of “have to.” I have to go to work. I have to study. I have to go see the new patient in room 6. I have to make time to workout. I have to meet up with my friend for dinner.

I know I am not alone in this.

We, professional students, get caught in the whirlwind of our responsibilities and our interests. To-do lists that stretch far too long down the page serve as our lifesource. We are unfailingly hardworking. We schedule naps. We schedule social time. We fail to be spontaneous.

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“Success is a science; if you have the conditions, you get the result.” – Oscar Wilde

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Is it just me or is 2017 going by extremely quickly? I cannot believe that tomorrow is the first of April. April is my last month of core clinical rotations. This year of medical school has been crazy. I feel like I mention in almost every post that medical school is hard. Each year in medical school has its own challenges. Third year is the awkward balance of two time-consuming roles: full-time student and health care provider. Each rotation comes with very different schedules (some schedules change on a weekly basis, others change every few days) and expectations. My biggest challenge has been to balance my work on the wards and to keep on top of my academics (there’s always a shelf exam on the horizon) and personal obligations (appointments and engagements).

I can easily say that the key to my sanity as a medical student is how I organize my day to day.

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